Tag Archives: Apple

Apple data storage and recovery

SSD Data Recovery
by quapan

Apple computers and tablets include iMac, MacBook, Mac mini, iPhone, iPad and other popular products. In this article I will talk about data recovery from all these products when they fail.

Apple computers and tablets are getting popular now. According to my personal opinion, more than 20 percent of the market now consists of Apple desktop computers called Mac, MacBooks, iPhones and iPads. These machines use traditional and new types of hard drive storages including internal and external. In internal they use traditional hard drives (drives with moving parts inside) and flash media. Data storage is one of the most important factors in personal and business use. In fact Mac computers are being used equally in business and for personal use. Businesses use them as servers and stand alone work stations in addition to vast use of Apple tablets by business executives. Talking of personal use, there is a huge end user market for Apple products (the most popular are MacBooks, iPhones, iPads etc.). They are in use in educational institutions, non-profit organizations, Airports, Defense departments, Hotels and other private and government areas.

Apple computers and laptops uses two kinds of storage media, a regular SATA or IDE drive and solid state drives. This is a fact that Apple MacBooks are well built and physically strong machines. So most of the time users think that nothing will happen in case of minor physical damage (which is true for the over all body of these MacBooks) but in case if these machines have traditional hard drives that use heads and platter then chances are the drive may receive a fair amount of damage making is hard for the machine to read it. The situation gets worse and worse when the same sick drive spins with every single use. On the other hand if the iMac or MacBook has an SSD known as solid state drive then physical damage wont do anything but as SSD drives are based on the same logic as the traditional drives are built, the data corruption is always possible. Other common problems still exists for example accidental format of the media, accidental overwrite issues, normal file damage etc.

So what happens if the drive fails? The best strategy is to backup data to an external hard drive. This way, two copies of the data will be available locally. Online backup has emerged as a replacement of local backup but it has a lot of drawbacks. If the Internet drops for sometime or if the online backup is not accessible then it becomes a huge problem. Also online backup is risky in the sense that when a user signs up for online agreement, the agreement clearly says that “in case of accidental data loss the online service will not be responsible”. This makes online backup a dangerous activity. Also a majority of computer users do not want to share their private data with online world. So what happens if there was no backup and the data was crucial? Data recovery becomes the next option. Apple computers are very good and reliable products but hard drives are from third parties which can fails anyways. In case of data loss, data recovery can be performed. There are two ways to do it. One is a logical data recovery that is done when a media is damaged as a result of file corruption. It is advised to use the software recovery very carefully as some software write to the media which will make the recovery impossible. The next stage is the hardware recovery which can be performed in clean rooms by professionals. In hardware recoveries, two techniques are used, by repairing drives using working parts and by using professional data recovery tools or machines.

In this article, I discussed about storage media used in Apple computers, Laptops, tablets and iPhones and different ways of dealing with the data if it is lost.

Written by Khan
MCSE, A+, Apple Certified and 22 years of IT experience.
Tech at:
notebook repair,macbook,ipad service,laptop

Apple Data Recovery

There used to be a time when a device malfunctioned and you just threw it away. Call it a lemon and get a new one – or maybe a better version. When my first cell phone crashed 12 years ago, I simply went to Radio Shack and bought a new one. I asked my 4 friends who also had cell phones to repeat their numbers and that was the end of it.

Not anymore. As technology is becoming more complicated and – at the same time – a greater necessity of our daily lives, the dependence on technological devices has also increased. Errors and malfunctions can no longer simply be ignored or discarded. We fill these devices with data and information that becomes critical to our daily lives. The loss of this information, or merely timely access to it, can have disastrous results on both our professional and personal lives. I am not trying to get on my soap box on this issue, merely stating that this is the way that things are – for better or for worse.

While it is arguably the best technology in the world, and indisputably in the top 5 or 10, Apple has created a host of products that have become ingrained in daily lives. Apple started with computers to compete with IBMs. They would eventually hit gold with the Macintosh models. This would evolve into the IMacs that ran on an OSX operating system that proved to be cleaner and less susceptible (or at least less targeted) for viruses compared to Microsoft Windows. ITunes and the IPod would follow, completely revolutionizing how users obtain and listen to music. The cell phone industry was rocked to its core with the development of the IPhone – which almost instantly made the Blackberry appear to be obsolete. Last year, Apple changed the way that we think about portable computing with the release of the IPad, a simple computing system focusing primarily on media and web programs/applications – the goal being to include most the features that laptop users use regularly while eliminating those that are more rarely delved into (all incorporating into a touch screen interface).

Despite all these successful and quality products, even Apple’s products are not beyond having errors and malfunctions. When these machines crash, large amounts of music files, pictures (jpegs), personal data, work documents, or other information may be at serious risk. Apple products are no more immune to needing data recovery than those of most other technology industry giants.

If you need data recovery for an Apple product, bear in mind that (for good reasons) Apple runs its computers on a different operating system than most companies. This does not mean that it is more difficult to recovery items from an Apple device, only that it is done a little differently compared to most recovery processes. Therefore, should you need data recovery for an Apple product, it is important to make sure that the company you are using for the recovery is adept at handling Apple products. Simple research on their qualifications and past experiences should suffice.

– Felix Chesterfield For more information on: Apple Data Recovery, please visit.

Apple Data Recovery

There used to be a time when a device malfunctioned and you just threw it away.  Call it a lemon and get a new one – or maybe a better version.  When my first cell phone crashed 12 years ago, I simply went to Radio Shack and bought a new one.  I asked my 4 friends who also had cell phones to repeat their numbers and that was the end of it.

 

Not anymore.  As technology is becoming more complicated and – at the same time – a greater necessity of our daily lives, the dependence on technological devices has also increased.  Errors and malfunctions can no longer simply be ignored or discarded.  We fill these devices with data and information that becomes critical to our daily lives.  The loss of this information, or merely timely access to it, can have disastrous results on both our professional and personal lives.  I am not trying to get on my soap box on this issue, merely stating that this is the way that things are – for better or for worse.

 

While it is arguably the best technology in the world, and indisputably in the top 5 or 10, Apple has created a host of products that have become ingrained in daily lives.  Apple started with computers to compete with IBMs.  They would eventually hit gold with the Macintosh models.  This would evolve into the IMacs that ran on an OSX operating system that proved to be cleaner and less susceptible (or at least less targeted) for viruses compared to Microsoft Windows.  ITunes and the IPod would follow, completely revolutionizing how users obtain and listen to music.  The cell phone industry was rocked to its core with the development of the IPhone – which almost instantly made the Blackberry appear to be obsolete.  Last year, Apple changed the way that we think about portable computing with the release of the IPad, a simple computing system focusing primarily on media and web programs/applications – the goal being to include most the features that laptop users use regularly while eliminating those that are more rarely delved into (all incorporating into a touch screen interface).

 

Despite all these successful and quality products, even Apple’s products are not beyond having errors and malfunctions.  When these machines crash, large amounts of music files, pictures (jpegs), personal data, work documents, or other information may be at serious risk.  Apple products are no more immune to needing data recovery than those of most other technology industry giants.

 

If you need data recovery for an Apple product, bear in mind that (for good reasons) Apple runs its computers on a different operating system than most companies.  This does not mean that it is more difficult to recovery items from an Apple device, only that it is done a little differently compared to most recovery processes.  Therefore, should you need data recovery for an Apple product, it is important to make sure that the company you are using for the recovery is adept at handling Apple products.  Simple research on their qualifications and past experiences should suffice.

 

– Felix Chesterfield

For more information on:  Apple Data Recovery, please visit.