Tag Archives: Drives

Recover Lost Data from Solid State Drives (SSD)

SSD Data Recovery
by Schill

Solid State drives, or SSD, ar totally different from typical arduous drives in this there are not any high speed disks spinning within the drive with read/write heads causing bits of knowledge here and there. they’re straightforward storage chip sets. typically DDR RAM or non-volatile storage to store the info being saved to them. specifically sort of a USB Flash drive, solely abundant larger. Solid state drives can take up less house yet.

Solid State drives, or SSD for brief, operate otherwise than typical arduous drives. they need no moving components, so they’re not as laid low with movements as commonplace arduous drives. thanks to this, they’re not as doubtless to lose knowledge in several of the ways in which arduous commonplace drives do. However, like any sort of drive, knowledge loss will occur, and once it will you would like to be prepared.

With the Amigabit knowledge Recovery Free, you’ll be able to recovery the lost or missing knowledge from your solid state drive simply. The code will recover several file sorts, such as; document files, unfold sheets, shows, image files, music files, and almost about the other sort there’s.

With the Amigabit knowledge Recovery code free transfer, the solution to your lost knowledge downside is a simple one. The code works on several pc software system, including: Windows 2000, XP, 2003, Vista, Windows seven and even Windows eight. With the straightforward to know computer program, you’ll be able to recover your lost files in no time in any respect.

Let’s have a glance at however straightforward it’s to use this code. browse the directions below;

1. Once you have got downloaded the free Amigabit knowledge Recovery code and put in it, merely launch the code on your pc. you’ll see the Amigabit interface that appears just like the image below.

Free Data Recovery Software2. Free knowledge Recovery Software2. you’ll got to decide which sort of scan you’d prefer to perform from the interface. Either “Fast Recovery” that is employed for deleted file, “Format Recovery” used for formatted files, “Raw knowledge Recovery” used once the drive is lost or corrupted.

3. ensuing step return to choosing the file sort you would like to recover. If you wish to recover knowledge of specific sort, simply check it. If you wish to recover all knowledge from your SSD, click Scan all to envision all the file sorts. Then click Next button to maneuver to next step .

Free Data Recovery Software

3. once the window opens, you’ll see the drive choices accessible. merely choose the drive that you simply need scanned from the list. Once you have got chosen it click on the scan button within the lower right corner of the interface.

Free Data Recovery Software

4. Once you click the scan button, the scanning method would be activated right away. Wait with patience.

Free Data Recovery Software

5 . Once the scanning is completed, you’ll see a file tree. merely choose the files that you simply would love to be rebuilt and once prompted, then choose the situation that you simply need them captive to, and save them.

recover data with free toolRecover data with free Amigabit

Besides having the ability to recover lost knowledge from solid state drives, Amigabit knowledge recovery code will recover knowledge from several different varieties of medium, such as; USB Flash drives, arduous drives, SD cards, external arduous drives, camera memory cards, movable memory cards, and more.

My name is Shiliar. I would like to share cool stuff about the latest PC maintenance software as well as tips and tricks. I work as an editor for Amigabit, which specializes in developing superior software for PC maintenance and Data Recovery.

Hybrid Hard Drives (SSHD) and Data Recovery

SSD Data Recovery
by Schill

Hybrid hard drives, or SSHD (Solid-State Hybrid Drives) are still specialty items, but they are slowly gaining popularity. Combining sheer storage capacity of traditional magnetic hard drives with extremely high access speed solid-state drives are known for, hybrid hard drives promise to offer the best of the two worlds. At least in theory.

Should you buy a hybrid hard drive, what is it best used for, and what should you do if an SSHD fails? Read our comprehensive review to find out.

Great for Single-Bay Devices
With the advent of true solid-state drives (SSD), manufacturers struggled with their limited storage capacity or, rather, the high cost per gigabyte of storage compared to traditional hard drives.

What a Hybrid Drive Is

As the name suggest, a hybrid hard drive (also known as SSHD, or Solid-State Hybrid Drive) is a storage unit combining the use of magnetic plates used in traditional hard drives with a faster (but smaller) flash-based solid-state media. While this is a vague definition, we can’t just say that SSHD’s are hard drives with a bunch of NAND flash chips to speed them up.

Basically, there are three types of hybrid drives.

The first technology involves using two individual devices, a larger hard drive and a smaller SSD, in a dual-drive hybrid configuration. These absolutely require support from the operating system and/or a chipset on the motherboard to receive hints about which data to cache on the small SSD.
The second type of hybrid devices was built on the same principle as the first, only integrating the two storage devices in one physical body. These still required driver support from the operating system. Without it, these devices would appear as two separate disk volumes to the OS.
The third, final type of hybrid drives are true SSHD’s. These devices not only integrate a HDD and an SSD into a single body, but implement all the caching logic in their own microcontrollers. These are the only true SSHD’s out there that can be used in any computer with or without explicit support for hybrid storage.
Dual-Device Hybrid Drives

Early hybrid drives were constructed of two different physical devices, a hard drive and a separate SSD drive to be used for caching. A special SATA controller in the computer’s motherboard would be utilized to merge the two devices together, presenting them as a single storage device to the operating system.

These technologies were developed by several manufacturers including ASUS (ASUS SSD Caching) and Intel (Intel Smart Response Technology, a part of their Intel Rapid Storage Technology for compatible chip sets). In effect, these technologies allowed using dual-drive configuration combining two separate low-cost devices: a larger (and slower) HDD with a smaller (but faster) SSD. The whole point of this technology was cost savings, as Intel officially recommended going for the low-cost (but high-capacity) hard drive and a low-cost, small-capacity SSD. Used in conjunction, the two devices could create a high-performance, cost-effective storage solution combining the storage capacity of a magnetic hard drive with faster response of an SSD drive (for frequently accessed data).

How small an SSD drive could one use for solid-state cache? Sizes as small as 16 GB were initially mentioned, but that was back some 3 to 4 years ago. However, in this day and age, going for anything smaller than 64 GB will not bring any noticeable cost savings.

Single-Disk SSHD’s

The technologies we just talked about were implemented in a controller in the motherboard. The controller would recognize the configuration and automatically cache frequently accessed data from the hard drive onto the smaller SSD drive. However, this is still a sub-optimal solution considering the extra layer of complexity installing and configuring the solution, the extra wires and data transfers via the SATA interface. Besides, these solutions were mostly limited to desktop computers, whereas laptops were actually devices to benefit most from this technology. Often equipped with a single bay for a laptop-sized device, laptop users used to have the choice between a larger, but much slower 2.5″ hard drive, a faster, but much smaller SSD drive, or a fast, high-capacity SSD at a sky-high price. Basically the users were offered to choose any two of the three benefits of cheap, fast or big.

SSHD’s changed the playing field significantly. These new devices are a type of computer hard drives with a built-in high performance SSD. These new devices effectively combined the low price and the high storage capacity of a traditional laptop HDD with the much higher speed of an SSD by building in NAND flash chips right into the device.

While SSHD’s look and work as a single physical device, they still have two storage areas inside. Sometimes you can even use them separately by disabling the Smart Response Technology (or similar) in your computer’s BIOS. However, the size of the solid-state volume is typically so small (it’s normally around the 16 GB mark) that splitting them makes little sense, and you’re better off by leaving the hybrid disk configured as a single device.

Older SSHD’s still use chipset features of your notebook to boosts performance. Intel Smart Response or similar technologies by other manufacturers are still there, actively monitoring data transfers and informing the drive about the data you use the most. Frequently accessed data (such as Windows system files and frequently used applications) are then cached into the built-in NAND chips for faster access.

Notably, new-generation SSHD’s move away from using motherboard-based technologies to optimize performance, integrating similar tech right into their own controllers.

Recovering Data from Hybrid Storage
Finally, we’re down to the interesting part. What are you going to do if a hybrid drive fails? The answer depends on what type of a hybrid drive you use.

If you used a dual-disk configuration, with a smaller SSD and a larger HDD, and the SSD part failed, you can simply disconnect the SSD and continue using your hard drive as usual (albeit with some loss of speed). If, however, the HDD fails, or if you have logical corruption (such as formatted volumes or deleted partitions), you’ll need a data recovery tool to recover your data.

First, identify a problem. Does your HDD still work, or has it failed permanently (as in mechanical fault)? If it’s a permanent failure, you can still bring the HDD (alone, without the SSD) to a repair shop, asking them to save information from that drive onto a new media. You can also use data carving (a signature-based data recovery technology available in tools such as Hetman Partition Recovery) to scan the SSD in low level in an attempt to recover any files that could be cached there. Due to the nature of the hybrid storage, your chances of recovering something other than a bunch of system files (or maybe a paging file) are slim.

If, however, your hard drive still works, but you’ve experienced loss of data, just treat your hybrid system as you would a normal hard drive. Download an appropriate data recovery tool and recover your data as if you were using a usual hard drive. In most situations it will be better disabling SSD caching in your computer’s BIOS; however, this is not an absolute must.

But what if you have a single-drive SSHD? Your actions would be essentially the same, with few exceptions. If the SSD partition has failed (e.g. after being worn out with multiple rewrites), you’re better off replacing that SSHD drive altogether – or can just keep using it with SSD partition disabled, and Smart Response Technology deactivated for that drive. You will be able to access all your data, albeit at slower speeds. DO NOT KEEP USING an SSHD drive with a worn-out SSD cache in hybrid mode! If you do this, you’ll be risking in reading corrupted data, or losing information being written onto the disk. If the SSD partition failed, disable it.

Finally, what if you have a true SSHD with no separate SSD and HDD partitions visible, and the SSD partition has failed? If this is the case, you will still be able to use a data recovery tool tools such as Hetman Partition Recovery to recover files from that drive. In some cases, you’ll be even able to read files normally without the need for a data recovery tool. However, under no circumstances should you keep using such a device, as you will likely start getting corrupted files sooner rather than later.

Source: http://hetmanrecovery.com/recovery_news/hybrid-hard-drive-and-data-recovery.htm

Hetman Software
Website: hetmanrecovery.com
E-mail: support_en@hetmanrecovery.com

Types of Computer and Laptop Hard Drives

In this article I will talk about different types of hard disks including flash, SSD, external and internal hard disks. I will cover all aspects of storage media.

The first type is USB flash drive. USB flash devices are similar to regular hard drive except they are small. Some are micro shape while others are regular pin size. USB storage media is very popular at the moment. The reason is the size and portability. Files can easily be transferred from one computer to another. USB flash devices come in only one file format which makes them compatible with PC and Mac computers. These come with a FAT file system. Thumb media comes in different capacities (32 MB to 64GB). USB media are safe devices unlike traditional hard storage whose failure rate is higher. The reason is, these flash devices do not use heads and platters. Thumb flash uses flash memory for data storage.

The next type of storage media is the famous hard drive. Hard drive comes in two basic types, internal and external. Internal hard disks are used inside computers and laptops in order to run the operating systems. External hard disks are externally used with computer systems to store data. External disks connect to computers via a USB cable. External hard disks have two types, desktop and portable. Desktop hard disks are regular while portables are known as 2.5 inch hard (made for portability). Hard disk uses different parts like PCB, heads, platters and spindle motor for operations. These have a long history of failure especially when they are dropped. Although any kind of hard can fail but these traditional disks have fragile heads and that is why if they fail more than flash drives. That is, a little movement can cause serious damage. As a whole these have long life cycle.

In internal there is a new family of media called SSD (solid state Drive). SSD uses memory chip for data storage just like USB flash. These are faster and more reliable but in fact these are slightly less reliable as other at least at the current stage of the technology. These can fail electronically or logically. The life cycle is also short because of the memory chip design. These SSDs come in different capacities. Because SSD are at their early stage, they are very expensive at the moment. The technology needs a lot of improvement. SSD drive memory can disappear with the passage of time. Data recovery from these hard disks is very expensive. These are part of both PCs and Macintosh computers.

The next kind is Raid technology. It’s not really a type of the hard drive. The purpose is to increase performance and storage. Raid arrays consist of more than one (to improve processing speed and to avoid data loss risks) disks. The other form is network disks. These are also called NAS (network access storage). NAS store data over network. Both NAS and Raid use windows and Linux operating systems. Data Recovery process involves changing parts in case of physical damage. The process is usually expensive.

The next type of data storage devices are known as SD cards. An SD card is a small flash chip that is used to store data in portable devices like phones, camcorders, digital cameras. One type is Micro SD card. These cards also use flash memory for data storage. Data recovery process involves both logical and physical recoveries. They come in 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64GB sizes. Micro SD cards have one problem though. These cards easily heats up during the usage and can fail. If micro SD cards fail physically, data recovery is almost impossible.

In this article I have explained about different types of data storage devices like hard, USB and SSD media.

By Khan
MCSE, A+, Apple Certified and 21 years in IT.
Tech at
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Data Recovery Toronto Mac mini

On Data Storage, Drives: Hard Drives, USB Flash Drive, SSD

Everyday we sit on our computers and inevitably get ourselves entangled with some problems that we often try to solve ourselves. Anyhow, we would usually know when something’s gone bad with our computers. Somehow we would gradually notice some changes on our computer’s performance. For instance, when our PCs would frequently experience problems with booting or when they would freeze quite a lot of times than before, then it is time to get them checked so we can prevent a crash.

We actually need more than just luck to get everything all in one piece. Our files on our hard drives, no matter how personal they are, they do have a lot of value to us. For this reason, we shouldn’t wait for these files to get corrupted before we would take some measures.

Indeed, when hard drive crashes, we are bound to lose our files in it (articles, photographs, music, videos, etc.). That is really a terrible ordeal for most of us who cherish and value our personal and sometimes work related files.

Some of us don’t really see all these things coming until they watch these things happening straight in their face. Now if we don’t want to watch ourselves in the biggest dismay when we lose those files, we have to realize that these things really do happen especially to the unprepared.

Indeed, the key is to be really prepared for the worst. To be really prepared means to anticipate that we may no longer be able to restore our files back after a crash. This fact should move us to do something so we can still have some access on our files. In our own little way, it should help us if we would do some file back-up.

There may be things like data recovery software that would eventually give us the chance to still restore our files after a crash but it’s better to end up not doing this at all. For those of us who have lost important data, we already know that it is not a happy experience at all. In our own little way, we can help ensure we still have copies of our data by keeping some back-up via an external hard drive. Saving copies of those files on to a USB flash drive is also a practical idea. Let’s do that for data storage’s sake.

Some people would also consider having their PCs or laptops running on a solid state drive (SSD) because they say it’s great for data storage and performs way better than a hard disk drive. While this may be true, what would probably make people want to get stuck with their hard disk drives is the fact that it would cost them a lot to choose SSD for an upgrade or replacement. If we can afford such an SSD upgrade, why not go for it?

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Why malware is growing along with the different types of Drives

SSD Data Recovery
by Schill

Why malware is growing along with the different types of Drives

There are many more drive types available than have been in the past 15 years. As technology grows, driver types expand, and malware becomes a bigger threat to security and a greater need for data recovery is felt. Following record-breaking losses from hackers stealing sensitive data, businesses and consumers have a deeper understand of how critical it is to have a disaster recovery plan and be more proactive about the threat of data loss.

As the prices for SSD and flash drives continue to fall, these options may cost close to the price of a hard drive. With dozens of different manufacturers and different types of flash and SSD drives, customers today have cheap data storage options available. Some data recovery centres are seeing an increase of 10 percent of customers bringing in their USB flash drives for data recovery. Given the sophistication of today’s scammers and hacking schemes, it makes sense there is a greater need for data security and data recovery. As new spinning drives components and new drive formats come on the market, data recovery teams may be facing a new type of malware attacks and viruses.

Why malware threats are growing and ultimately costing More

As cyber crime increases, the number of malware also rises. Thanks to a new Trojan horse dubbed “CryptoLocker,” computer users may be paying more to unlock their own data. This virus, discovered in 2013, focuses victims to pay a ransom to have their own computer data unlocked. While some victims have been able to get their data unlocked after the deadline, the amount of the ransom substantially increased. This begs the question whether viruses and malware are becoming more dangerous and expensive overall.

This also is opening new challenges for data recovery experts. They may need to learn new techniques to repair some drives that use more spinning disk components or are filled with helium. This is why trained professionals need to not only have a disaster data recovery plan, but also watch new technologies closely. The only way to stop new emerging threats, is to closely follow their development. Would data recovery specialist benefit from taking classes to learn new emerging threats? It would be a good idea, especially if a data recovery expert wants to build their reputation for recovering data.

Have you ever had to pay a hacker to recover sensitive data before? Isn’t it nice to know that your data may not be lost? If a company does lose some sensitive data, employees at Easy Data Recovery can help retrieve data. We don’t charge a fee unless data is recovered.

We offer services such as retrieving data from a raid array raid 5 recovery, apple hard drive recovery, USB flash drive recovery and many more services. For more on our services, visit us at: www.easydatarecovery.ie